spot_img

Leopard Angelfish (Pterophyllum Scalare)

As a leopard angelfish matures and reaches adulthood, their markings continuously grow closer together. This phenotype is a result of selectively breeding a combination of smokey and zebra genes.

Blue Leopard Angelfish (Pterophyllum Scalare)

As a blue leopard angelfish matures and reaches adulthood, their markings continuously grow closer together. Additionally, they are one of Pterophyllum Scalare's rarest phenotypes and might be hard to locate in stores; if you do, don't hesitate!

Clown Angelfish (Pterophyllum Scalare)

Both the zebra and the stripeless genes are present in equal amounts in clown angelfish. This phenotype has white and silver undertones with inconsistent patches of black stripes and dots throughout their entire body.

Smokey Angelfish (Pterophyllum Scalare)

The smokey angelfish only has one smokey gene, as opposed to the chocolate angelfish's two. Their fins and the rear of this phenotype display black and grey patterns, while the rest of their body has softer colorations.

Zebra Lace Angelfish (Pterophyllum Scalare)

Due to their similar features, silver angelfish and zebra lace angelfish are sometimes mistaken for one another. The zebra angelfish has one or two additional black vertical stripes, whereas a silver angelfish has four vertical stripes.

Gold Angelfish (Pterophyllum Scalare)

In contrast to the gold marble angelfish, gold angelfish display an entirely white with an orange and yellow hue, usually far more noticeable in color are their head and dorsal fin. Due to the recessive nature of the gold gene, two copies are necessary for this phenotype.

Most Popular

spot_img

Latest Articles

Black-Winged Hatchetfish (Carnegiella Marthae)

Since most species of fish inhabit the lower and middle levels of the aquarium, aquarists looking for a distinctively shaped fish to incorporate into a community tank with other fish of similar size and temperament will like the black-winged hatchetfish.

Golden Empire Gudgeon (Hypseleotris Compressa)

The golden empire gudgeon is one of around 11 species in the most widely distributed genus found in Australia, Hypseleotris. Their present family, the Gobiiformes, was previously a suborder of the Perciformes, which once contained 2,211 species but has since been divided into seven families.

Empire Gudgeon (Hypseleotris Compressa)

The empire gudgeon is one of around 11 species in the most widely distributed genus found in Australia, Hypseleotris. Their present family, the Gobiiformes, was previously a suborder of the Perciformes, which once contained 2,211 species but has since been divided into seven families.

Gold Agassiz’s Dwarf Cichlid (Apistogramma Agassizii)

Within the Cichlidae family, Apistogramma is the most species-rich genus, which explains why they are also the most popular in the aquarium hobby. Due to their vibrant colors, Apistogramma like the gold agassiz’s dwarf cichlid has been highly sought after.

Fire Red Agassiz’s Dwarf Cichlid (Apistogramma Agassizii)

Within the Cichlidae family, Apistogramma is the most species-rich genus, which explains why they are also the most popular in the aquarium hobby. Due to their vibrant colors, Apistogramma like the fire red agassiz’s dwarf cichlid has been highly sought after.

Agassiz’s Dwarf Cichlid (Apistogramma Agassizii)

Within the Cichlidae family, Apistogramma is the most species-rich genus, which explains why they are also the most popular in the aquarium hobby. Due to their vibrant colors, Apistogramma like the agassiz's dwarf cichlid has been highly sought after.

Golden Harlequin Rasbora (Trigonostigma Heteromorpha)

Since their introduction in the early 1900s, the golden harlequin rasbora has become the most common species of rasbora kept within the aquarium hobby. Their scientific name Heteromorpha actually refers to its rather distinctive color pattern, which is undoubtedly the reason this species gained so much popularity.

Black Harlequin Rasbora (Trigonostigma Heteromorpha)

Since their introduction in the early 1900s, the black harlequin rasbora has become the most common species of rasbora kept within the aquarium hobby. Their scientific name Heteromorpha actually refers to its rather distinctive color pattern, which is undoubtedly the reason this species gained so much popularity.

Don't Miss